ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION: SPECIES & HABITATS

Hluleka

Hluleka is a marine conservation themed nature documentary that aims to encourage community engagement in decision-making. The story focuses on South Africa’s smallest marine protected area, Hluleka. 

We follow Jamila Janna on an emotional journey unpacking the history, the present and the future through the facilitation of solution-based discussions around inclusivity in decision-making.

A Canopy of Hope:
The Legacy of Wangari Maathai

This film documents the work of four African/Kenyan conservationists in diverse spaces: conservation photography, hiking, food and seed sovereignty and community-based conservation. 

The film showcases how their work interlinks with the ideas and philosophies of  Prof. Wangari Maathai. They articulate their passion for conservation and their hopes and desires in contributing to conservation practices that are oriented to the needs and aspirations of African peoples. They are working to build what Prof. Wangari Maathai referred to as “A canopy of hope”.

Invasion

Ten powerful women in conservation science and media from South Africa, Nigeria, Tanzania, Mozambique, Rwanda, Zambia and Kenya were selected for the NEWF Wild Women Media Lab. 

From 10th – 22nd August 2020, the cohort engaged in intensive online filmmaking workshops with industry experts and mentors from around the world to guide them through the process of producing a micro-film – a first time experience for all. Each participant was provided with a media making legacy package, allowing them to each develop, film and edit their stories in just a few days.
The NEWF Wild Women Media Lab was designed in partnership with Jackson Wild and supported by HHMI Tangled Bank Studios, American Film Showcase, US State Department, United States Mission South Africa and National Geographic Society.

About the film:
INVASION is a short film about how development within a protected area brings about invasive species, which have a negative effect on the ecosystem in Nairobi National Park.

NWEF Wild Women Media Lab
Film Showcase

Ten powerful women in conservation science and media from South Africa, Nigeria, Tanzania, Mozambique, Rwanda, Zambia and Kenya were selected for the NEWF Wild Women Media Lab. 

For 12 days the cohort engaged in intensive online filmmaking workshops with industry experts and mentors from around the world to guide them through the process of producing a micro-film – a first time experience for all. Each participant was provided with a media making legacy package, allowing them to each develop, film and edit their stories in just a few days. The NEWF Wild Women Media Lab was been designed in partnership with Jackson Wild and was supported by HHMI Tangled Bank Studios, American Film Showcase, the United States Mission South Africa and National Geographic Society.

Micro Films:

  • Saving Pangolins by Janado Nazare Cher (Mozambique)
  • Bo Bosso – Waste Collectors by Bongeka Makabeni (South Africa)
  • Fighting Rabies by Mercy Njobvu (Zambia)
  • Guardians of the Night by Marie Claire Dusabe (Rwanda)
  • Iltorok by Catherine Nchimbi (Tanzania)
  • Invasion by Norah Rotich (Kenya)
  • Wozani by Nonhle Mngadi (South Africa)
  • Hurt by Science by Candice Ann Lortan
  • When the Forest Goes Silent by Rachel Ashegbofe Ikemeh

(Individual synopsis for each film can be provided upon request)

The Sustaining Buzz​

Pollinators are responsible for the production of various crops, fruits, fibres, medicinal plants and the regeneration of wild plants. However, many farmers lack the knowledge to identify the beneficial insects from damaging pests.

At the same time, indiscriminate use of pesticides as clearing techniques are contributing to their decline. There are serious implications in pollinator destruction for food security, livelihoods, human health, industries and the global economy. This film showcases some of the pollinators and highlights how important it is for scientists and farmers to work together for conservation and better yields and incomes.

Fahari Yetu

When the fishermen of Ras Fumba on Zanzibar Island, discovered their catch was rapidly decreasing twenty years ago, they decided to take action.  

Outsiders were ruining the local marine environment by overfishing and destructive fishing techniques so local residents asked the government to intervene.

With the backing of NGOs, the Fisheries Department set up the 180 Square mile Menai Bay Conservation Area. 
People now come from all the world to learn how Zanzibar conserved its marine resources by involving local communities. 200 humpback & bottlenose dolphins have returned to shorelines where they were once hunted for food, and the marine environment has largely recovered. Despite this remarkable achievement, the villagers of Ras Fumba have to keep up their patrols to stop those employing highly destructive means of fishing, including dynamite and poison.

Vulturine Guineafowls​

At 21 Brendah has chosen a career in animal behavioral science. She records their interactions, follow their movements, and goes in the wild at night to download data from the recorded guinea fowls. 

Her story is spectacular as it is not usual to find young people her age referring to the amazing work she is doing as a career.

Do Rhino's have a Future​

In 1970 Kenya had 20,000 black rhinos. By 1989 only 400 rhinos were left. In 2017 alone, Kenya lost 9 rhinos to poaching. 

The only way to save rhinos from extinction is to create a secure habitat for them to live and breed. Next on Giving Nature a Voice, watch the remarkable story of how Ol Pejeta Conservancy is saving its rhinos. The conservancy, which started with only 4 black rhinos in 1988 now has 114.

Fish's New Life​

In the coastal town of Mostaganem (Algeria), a group of young people passionate about the sea decides to create an artificial reef and immerse it in the sea on their own.

Will this experience be successful in a sandy bottom?

Watch Fish’s New Life here
https://www.musicbed.com/challenge/submissions/fishs-new-life/oRdpon

Part of the Pack

This film will educate the public on an endangered species in their country that no one knows or is talking about.

We will look at what makes an African Wild Dog so unique and give insight on how they are as a species with regards to their social dynamics and hunting techniques as a pack.

Part of the Pack will take the form of a short conservation documentary on African Wild Dogs. It is one of Earth’s oldest canines, with every dog having a unique coat differentiating the pack and giving them individuality.

Watch Part of the Pack here 
https://www.seeker.com/indie/part-of-the-pack

Phefumla (Breathe)

“Phefumla” follows Loyiso Dunga, a marine scientist from one of South Africa’s most infamous townships, as he embarks on an opportunity of a lifetime. 

He must overcome his fears of drowning and…breathe, to realize his dream of diving deep into the oceans vastness. Through his first sensory overloaded experiences, Loyiso makes profound observations of how humans can learn from the oceans interconnected ecosystems and way of life. Whilst he breathes the oceans calm and experiences first-hand the threat to our oceans biodiversity and the air we breathe, he feels compelled to amplify his responsibility as a marine scientist.

The Eyes of the Land

The biodiversity crisis is one of the most critical issues on the planet. Prompt diagnoses are needed to stop the species’ extinction. 

One threatened species is the spur-thighed tortoise in Morocco. However, determining the presence or absence of this species in the wild is very challenging even with the most advanced technological equipment and experimented researchers. To save the species, science needs those who know better the secrets of the land: The shepherds.